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Posts tagged ‘PhD’

Guanajuato alum spotlight: Nicole LeNeave

Through leadership development, experiential learning, and engaged service, Guanajuato alumni have had an incredible impact through our programs, and continue to make their mark in their careers. One of these professionals we had the pleasure of connecting with is Nicole LeNeave, UNC ’14.

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LeNeave (center) on the 2014 APPLES Global Course Guanajuato alternative spring break

Nicole LeNeave is a Ph.D. candidate, Department of History, at The University of California, San Diego. She is studying the cultural history of the Cold War in Latin America; specifically, looking at insurgency and rebellion through a music and art lens. Since graduating as a double major in Latin American studies (LTAM) and Latin American History with a music minor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, LeNeave continues to have wide-ranging experiences in Latin American Studies.

As an undergraduate, LeNeave served as an Institute for the Study of the Americas (ISA) intern where she transcribed oral history interviews and supported department communications. The work encouraged her to participate in the 2014 APPLES alternative spring break, which gave her the opportunity to record oral histories herself. After interviewing UNC Latino students and speaking with members of the Guanajuato, Mexico community, LeNeave was struck by the power of an individual’s narrative.

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LeNeave (right) with ISA Director Lou Pérez (left)

“Oral histories are intrinsically part of the way we function.” LeNeave said. “They provide a greater understanding beyond the empirical nature of academia.”

Originally from Charlotte, North Carolina, LeNeave first became interested in Latin American studies after taking a first year seminar with Professor Miguel La Serna about revolution and rebellion in Latin America. When it came to declaring a major, LeNeave liked the interdisciplinary nature of the LTAM major. The political science, music, history, anthropology classes all helped to frame her other major of Latin American history.

“LTAM is a great complement to another major,” LeNeave said. “I encourage people to do it and make it your own.”

LeNeave did just that, and with a future Ph.D. and dreams of a tenure-track professor position, she is just getting started.

Nicole, we look forward to seeing your forthcoming research and the great things you will do! Thank you for joining us.