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Posts tagged ‘Immigrant Integration’

UNC College of Arts and Sciences features Winston-Salem BIC National League of Cities Award

hannahandwanda

Wanda Allen-Abraha, J.D., Director, Human Relations Department for the City of Winston-Salem (right) with LMP Director Hannah Gill

(en español abajo)

The City of Winston-Salem, NC was honored with a 2017 City Cultural Diversity Award from the National League of Cities (NLC). The city was awarded First Place in the 200,001-500,000 population category in specific recognition of the Winston-Salem BIC Newcomers’ Pipeline.

The forthcoming pipeline program was developed by the Winston-Salem Human Relations Department and diverse project stakeholders during the city’s 2014-2017 partnership with the statewide BIC initiative at UNC-Chapel Hill. The pipeline will provide an integrated, efficient, and accessible way for foreign-born and Hispanic/Latinx residents to learn about municipal and community resources related to education, Fair Housing, faith, health, language access, legal services, public safety, and transportation.

The Winston-Salem City Council unanimously approved the Winston-Salem BIC Citywide Action Plan for Foreign-born and Hispanic Community Integration last November. This action plan outlines the other initiatives that are being implemented currently the Winston-Salem BIC Stakeholder Committee.

Read the action plan in English here: W-S BIC Action Plan-English
Read the action plan in Spanish here: W-S-BIC-Action-Plan-Spanish

Congratulations to Winston-Salem BIC and the City of Winston-Salem Human Relations Department!

El proyecto Winston-Salem BIC gana el Primer Lugar del premio de la Liga Nacional de Ciudades

La Ciudad de Winston-Salem, NC fue galardonada el día con el ‘City Cultural Diversity Award’ (Premio de la Diversidad Cultural de Ciudad) de 2017 de la Liga Nacional de Ciudades, o la NLC por sus siglas en inglés. La ciudad fue galardonada el Primer Lugar en la categoría poblacional de 200,001-500,000 personas en reconocimiento específico al ‘Newcomers’ Pipeline’ (Camino de los Recién Llegados) de Winston-Salem BIC.

Este ‘pipeline’ es un programa en camino que fue desarrollado por el Departamento de Relaciones Humanas de Winston-Salem y diversas partes interesadas de proyecto durante su colaboración del 2014-2017 con la iniciativa estatal BIC en UNC-Chapel Hill. El ‘pipeline’ proveerá una forma eficiente, integrada, y accesible en la cual los residentes nacidos en el extranjero e hispanos/latinx puedan aprender sobre recursos comunitarios y municipales relacionados a la educación, Vivienda Justa, fe, salud, acceso de idioma, servicios legales, seguridad pública, y transporte.

El pasado noviembre el Consejo Municipal de Winston-Salem aprobó unánimemente el Plan de Acción Municipal de Winston-Salem BIC para la Integración de los Residentes Nacidos en el Extranjero e la Comunidades Hispanas. Este plan de acción delinea las otras iniciativas que están siendo implementadas actualmente por el Comité de Partes Interesadas de Winston-Salem BIC.

Lea el plan de acción en inglés aquí: W-S BIC Action Plan-English
Lea el plan de acción en español aquí: W-S-BIC-Action-Plan-Spanish

¡Felicitaciones a Winston-Salem BIC y la Ciudad de Departamento de Relaciones Humanas de Winston-Salem!

Winston-Salem BIC Project Earns City First Place National League of Cities Award

hannahandwanda

Wanda Allen-Abraha, J.D., Director, Human Relations Department for the City of Winston-Salem (right) with LMP Director Hannah Gill

(en español abajo)

The City of Winston-Salem, NC was honored with a 2017 City Cultural Diversity Award from the National League of Cities (NLC). The city was awarded First Place in the 200,001-500,000 population category in specific recognition of the Winston-Salem BIC Newcomers’ Pipeline.

The forthcoming pipeline program was developed by the Winston-Salem Human Relations Department and diverse project stakeholders during the city’s 2014-2017 partnership with the statewide BIC initiative at UNC-Chapel Hill. The pipeline will provide an integrated, efficient, and accessible way for foreign-born and Hispanic/Latinx residents to learn about municipal and community resources related to education, Fair Housing, faith, health, language access, legal services, public safety, and transportation.

The Winston-Salem City Council unanimously approved the Winston-Salem BIC Citywide Action Plan for Foreign-born and Hispanic Community Integration last November. This action plan outlines the other initiatives that are being implemented currently the Winston-Salem BIC Stakeholder Committee.

Read the action plan in English here: W-S BIC Action Plan-English
Read the action plan in Spanish here: W-S-BIC-Action-Plan-Spanish

Congratulations to Winston-Salem BIC and the City of Winston-Salem Human Relations Department!

El proyecto Winston-Salem BIC gana el Primer Lugar del premio de la Liga Nacional de Ciudades

La Ciudad de Winston-Salem, NC fue galardonada el día con el ‘City Cultural Diversity Award’ (Premio de la Diversidad Cultural de Ciudad) de 2017 de la Liga Nacional de Ciudades, o la NLC por sus siglas en inglés. La ciudad fue galardonada el Primer Lugar en la categoría poblacional de 200,001-500,000 personas en reconocimiento específico al ‘Newcomers’ Pipeline’ (Camino de los Recién Llegados) de Winston-Salem BIC.

Este ‘pipeline’ es un programa en camino que fue desarrollado por el Departamento de Relaciones Humanas de Winston-Salem y diversas partes interesadas de proyecto durante su colaboración del 2014-2017 con la iniciativa estatal BIC en UNC-Chapel Hill. El ‘pipeline’ proveerá una forma eficiente, integrada, y accesible en la cual los residentes nacidos en el extranjero e hispanos/latinx puedan aprender sobre recursos comunitarios y municipales relacionados a la educación, Vivienda Justa, fe, salud, acceso de idioma, servicios legales, seguridad pública, y transporte.

El pasado noviembre el Consejo Municipal de Winston-Salem aprobó unánimemente el Plan de Acción Municipal de Winston-Salem BIC para la Integración de los Residentes Nacidos en el Extranjero e la Comunidades Hispanas. Este plan de acción delinea las otras iniciativas que están siendo implementadas actualmente por el Comité de Partes Interesadas de Winston-Salem BIC.

Lea el plan de acción en inglés aquí: W-S BIC Action Plan-English
Lea el plan de acción en español aquí: W-S-BIC-Action-Plan-Spanish

¡Felicitaciones a Winston-Salem BIC y la Ciudad de Departamento de Relaciones Humanas de Winston-Salem!

LEE COUNTY: Health department, schools work to integrate Latinos

LEE COUNTY: Health department, schools work to integrate Latinos
Brown, Brandi. McClatchy – Tribune Business News [Washington] 27 Sep 2015.

Sept. 27–SANFORD — The Lee County Health Department and Lee County Schools are making moves to address and accommodate the growing Hispanic population — although concerns remain in a report released earlier this week.

The Latino Migration Project, a service of the University of North Carolina — Chapel Hill, studies the integration of Hispanic and Latino immigrants into various North Carolina communities. Researchers published findings Monday from a year-long assessment of local immigrant residents.

That study was conducted as part of a three-year Sanford Building Integrated Communities (BIC) project, a collaborative initiative of the city of Sanford, local residents and organization leaders, and The Latino Migration Project.

The results of the study show that access to health care and education are two priorities for the 19 percent of Lee County residents who identify themselves as Hispanic.

Lee County Health Department’s Health Education Supervisor Ashley Graham served on the study’s planning committee. The health department, she said, sees many Spanish-speaking clients.

For people who speak Spanish, Graham said the department employs two interpreters who can meet with clients. The department also contracts with a language line that providers at the clinic call if there is someone who speaks a different language and needs assistance.

The department also makes an effort to provide information in brochures and pamphlets in English and Spanish. LeeCAN, a local community action network, has a list of mental health providers and identifies in their literature whether the provider can assist Spanish-speaking patients, Graham said.

“We pass those out to our clients who we think may be in need of a mental health referral,” she said. “We also have health information in both English and Spanish that we have available at places like the library and Helping Hands Clinic [a clinic for people who are uninsured in Sanford].”

One of the concerns cited in the report is the lack of available health care services and transportation to those services. While Lee County doesn’t have a full public transit system, it does have COLTS (County of Lee Transit System), and Executive Director Debbie Davidson said it’s a place people can call to get transportation to the health clinic.

“All of the service options can be difficult to explain,” she said. “We have a DASH vehicle that goes in a loop to popular Sanford sites, much like a city bus. The fare is $2. Then we have contract with agencies like Senior Services and CCCC, and we can pick people up through them. The best way to find out whether we can help with your transportation needs is to call us.”

The COLTS office can be reached at (919) 776-7201.

Davidson said the system also is working to improve services for bilingual residents. COLTS recently hired a bilingual phone operator who works noon to 5 p.m., and it has a bilingual driver.

Concerns about education in the report include both youth and adults. In particular, the study cites a concern about communication with immigrant parents.

Lynn Warren, director of the English as a second language and secondary literacy for Lee County Schools, said the school system has a number of programs in place to assist with communication.

“We have teacher assistants who are bilingual. They perform typical jobs of teacher assistants but also are available to speak with parents when needed,” she said. “We have a parent liaison who has worked to contact parents directly through phone calls to invite them to events.”

The school system has become a conduit in addressing several community-related concerns of Spanish-speaking parents. Warren said various schools have parents’ nights conducted in Spanish.

“We’ve had police officers participate and discuss safety and security issues, including gang prevention. We also have a bilingual social worker who can help families,” she said.

Efforts are ongoing to have bilingual staff members available and to help teachers learn how to modify assignments for students with limited English proficiency, Warren said.

The next step in the Latino Migration Project for Sanford is collaboration on a city-wide integration action plan. Anyone who wishes to be part of this planning may call (919) 966-1484. The report is now available to the public in English at bit.ly/1LFND57, and a full Spanish translation also will be published online and distributed.

Credit: The Sanford Herald, N.C.
_(c)2015 The Sanford Herald (Sanford, N.C.) Visit The Sanford Herald (Sanford, N.C.) at www.sanfordherald.com Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

DEADLINE OCT. 20—APPLES Global Course Guanajuato

groupshot_1APPLY NOW

This 3 credit spring course combines ethnographic methods, oral history, and service-learning to examine Latin American migrant perspectives. Students research and work with migrants in North Carolina and spend spring break in migrants’ home communities in Guanajuato, Mexico.

The course addresses ethical and practical aspects of the ethnographic method, which includes the preparation, transaction, and transcription of interviews. This course is designed for upper level students (Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors) and is also open to graduate students. Strong knowledge of Spanish is highly recommended. Students must be prepared to volunteer at a campus or community organization that works with migrant issues. Digital audio recorders are required. Above all, students must be motivated by a strong desire to better understand transnational migration issues.

APPLICATION REQUIRED (DEADLINE OCT. 20) — APPLY NOW

 

Sanford Herald Feature—Study pinpoints obstacles for local minorities

Byline: Brandi BrownBIC

Sept. 22–SANFORD — Lee County’s growing immigrant population faces several hurdles in adjusting to living in the community, according to a new study issued Monday.

A report released by the University of Chapel Hill’s Latino Migration Project details seven areas — health care, picture identification, education, government communication, police interaction, public transportation and workers’ rights — where immigrants in Lee County say they have difficulties. The goal of the report is to identify the needs of the immigrants who make up one-fifth of Lee County’s population and to share their recommendations with the community.

Researchers collected surveys from 307 foreign-born residents and conducted bilingual meetings with 225 immigrant residents in Lee County. The results of those responses, along with data analysis from Sanford/Lee County Strategic Services and the U.S. Census Bureau formed the basis of the report.

The report is another step in the identifying the needs of minorities as part of the statewide Building Integrated Communities initiative that helps North Carolina local governments successfully engage with Latinos and other immigrant communities in order to improve public safety, promote economic development, enhance communication and improve relationships. Sanford, along with Winston Salem, was selected for the imitative.

Among the biggest problems cited was the need for improved access to health care services. This lack of access has a variety of sources, according to the report. Immigrant residents often cannot afford the cost of either insurance or out-of-pocket medical expenses. In addition, they may not be able to travel to doctors’ offices or clinics because of the lack of public transportation, and language barriers persist once the patients arrive at their destination.

Among the resident recommendations cited in study to improve health care were offer affordable medications, offer lower cost medical, dental and mental health services as well as open community health clinics or public hospitals nearby.

Crystal Hickman, director of public relations at Central Carolina Hospital, said that the hospital has a number of services in place to help address the needs of patients who do not speak English.

“We have an onsite interpreter who can speak with patients as that need arises. We also have a language line with a number of languages that we can access if an interpreter is not available,” she said.

As for the high cost of health care that is an issue that the hospital has plans in place to address for all low-income patients.

“Of course, we have to see anyone who comes in with an emergency health situation. We do write off some cases as part of our charity care for people who cannot afford it,” Hickman said. “We also have one-on-one counseling. Someone will come to a patient’s room and go through options, such as ACA [Affordable Care Act] eligibility and sign-up. The materials that we have are in Spanish and English.”
Improved communication with providers of city services is another issue that the report highlights.

“Discussion groups emphasized a need for improved communication, including more Spanish-language communication, of information about basic city/county regulations and services, civic rights and responsibilities, and community resources,” according to the report.

The next step is for officials behind the Latino Migration Project to create strategies to address identified needs, which will take the form of a recommended action plan for the city, said Hannah Gill, director of the Latino Migration Project, in an April 4 edition of The Herald.

Sanford Mayor Chet Mann was unavailable for comment Monday.

The full report is available at http://migration.unc.edu/.
___
(c)2015 The Sanford Herald (Sanford, N.C.)
Visit The Sanford Herald (Sanford, N.C.) at www.sanfordherald.com
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.
By Brandi Brown

APPLES Global Course Guanajuato—Application is live!

IMG_4271APPLY NOW

This 3 credit spring course combines ethnographic methods, oral history, and service-learning to examine Latin American migrant perspectives. Students research and work with migrants in North Carolina and spend spring break in migrants’ home communities in Guanajuato, Mexico.

The course addresses ethical and practical aspects of the ethnographic method, which includes the preparation, transaction, and transcription of interviews. This course is designed for upper level students (Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors) and is also open to graduate students. Strong knowledge of Spanish is highly recommended. Students must be prepared to volunteer at a campus or community organization that works with migrant issues. Digital audio recorders are required. Above all, students must be motivated by a strong desire to better understand transnational migration issues.

APPLICATION REQUIRED (DEADLINE OCT. 20) — APPLY NOW

 

Sanford City Council Success/Éxito con el Consejo de la Ciudad

CONGRATULATIONS to Sanford BIC Committee Members Rev. Erika Martínez Flores and Santiago Giraldo for delivering powerful addresses to Sanford City Council August 12 on behalf of Sanford BIC and the local immigrant community. You can watch them on the Sanford.gov website:

http://sanfordnc.net/City_Government/Council/meetings_video.htm

(Click on “08-12-15”; requires Windows Media Player.)

Rev. Erika’s speech begins @36:52 and Santiago’s speech @40:20!

FELICIDADES a la Rev. Erika Martínez Flores y el Sr. Santiago Giraldo, miembros del Comité de BIC, por dar discursos poderosos al Consejo de la Ciudad de Sanford 12 de agosto en nombre de Sanford BIC y la comunidad inmigrante local. Pueden verlos en el sitio de Sanford.gov:
http://sanfordnc.net/City_Government/Council/meetings_video.htm
(Haga clic en el “08-12-15”; se requiere Windows Media Player para tocarlo.)
La Rev. Erika habla @36:52 y Santiago @40:20!

Upcoming Event: International Village

We hope you will join us in Winston-Salem for the International Village event Sept. 12, 2015. For more details, click here.

InternationalVillage

Thank you for your support #LMPJuneJam

lmpjunejam#LMPJuneJam 

BIG thank you to our supporters and LMP Alumni Committee members for making this year’s June Jam a success! Thank you especially to Katie Gutt, Alex Dest and Felicia Arriaga. We couldn’t have done it without you!

Details

The Latino Migration Project directs a number of award-winning programs: New Roots / Nuevas Raíces, Building Integrated Communities, and Guanajuato Connections.

And we’re just getting started.

In honor of our 10th birthday in 2017, we are raising $10,000 in the next two years to meet our goals. All donations will cover:

  • Sponsor five students to Guanajuato and support the education and economic development in the Mexican communities of origin of immigrants in North Carolina. Since 2007, APPLES Course Guanajuato alumni have pursued careers in fields that directly work with immigrants. These students are very competitive in a state and region with great need for a bilingual workforce with these skills: in fact, 97% of our alumni find jobs or enter graduate school within one year of graduating.
  • Support documenting how Latinos are making history in North Carolina by adding voices to the Southern Oral History Project’s Notable North Carolinians” oral history series. As an ongoing, permanent research initiative, New Roots / Nuevas Raíces has so far generated more than 175 audio-recorded interviews (a total of 200+ hours) and their full transcriptions, field notes and tape logs. It is one of the fastest growing collections of its kind, producing 40-50 new interviews annually that are archived with the Southern Oral History Program’s collections and in Wilson Library at UNC-Chapel Hill.
  • Expand Building Integrated Communities to work with more NC municipalities. So far, we’ve worked with 4 out of 100 NC counties. By 2017, we want to have worked with more. Building Integrated Communities has gained international and national recognition for its work with partner cities, so far having worked with High Point, Greenville and is currently working with Winston-Salem and Sanford.

Get Involved!

  • Join us the week of June 22-26 and SHARE your favorite photos and memories with the Latino Migration Project by tagging #LMPJuneJam. Whether you spent an alternative spring break in Guanajuato, recorded an oral history, or worked with Building Integrated Communities, we invite YOU to show your support.
  • Share the “Donate” button below with the direct link to donate, https://secure.dev.unc.edu/gift/Default.aspx?p=LMPU
  • Review the Online Fundraising Guide for more ideas to support the #LMPJuneJam

Donate

 

Building Integrated Communities—Sanford Public Meeting Success!

We are pleased to announce the Saturday Sanford Building Integrated Communities public forum was a success! An estimated 200 participants engaged in conversations to share many important perspectives that the Building Integrated Communities team will begin to summarize.

Mayor Chet Mann and Councilwoman Rebecca Wyhof attended and participated in group discussions, showing great support for the work to follow. We thank Deacon Emilio Mejia and everyone who attended. Enjoy the photos (below)!