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Posts from the ‘Research’ Category

Article Recommendation: Young Projects, I Will Not Serve on the IAC

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On Sept. 17, 2014, approximately 70 attendees from across the state gathered for an Immigrant Integration Summit. We were pleased with the engaging conversations created and are even more delighted to feature an article by one of the Greensboro attendees. Titled, “I Will Not Serve on the IAC,” this author speaks to why they will not be joining the new International Advisory Committee (IAC) and its mission to connect newcomer refugee and immigrant neighborhoods and communities.

We hope you will enjoy! Click here to access the article.

Building Integrated Communities (BIC) is a statewide initiative that helps North Carolina local governments successfully engage with immigrants and refugee populations to improve public safety, promote economic development, enhance communication, and improve relationships. As a result of working with BIC, local governments and diverse community stakeholders have the tools to generate locally-relevant strategies to strengthen immigrant civic engagement, linguistic achievement, and economic/educational advancement.

The program is supported by the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation.

 

 

A year in review: 2014 Research Spotlights

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The Latino Migration Project is pleased to offer Latino Migration Research Awards that range between $500-$1000. They are available to UNC Chapel Hill students and faculty conducting research relating to Latin American/Latino migration (awards have been made for 2014).

Read three award recipients’ stories:

  •  Paul Fleming, who is using his research award to further his public health focus as it relates to migrant populations.
  • Andrew Ofstehage, who is using his research award to conduct an ethnographical report on two transnational farming populations who have migrated from North America to Brazil to produce soybeans.
  • Jeanine Navarrete, who is using her award to research the development of reactionary anti-immigration and anti-Latino politics in Miami, Florida from 1965 to 1980.

We wish all award recipients the best of luck and look forward to the results!

 

Press Release: New Open-Access Short Works from UNC Press and the Institute for the Study of the Americas

We’re delighted to share the good news! Enjoy the official announcement (below):

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

UNC Press contact: Gina Mahalek, 919-962-0581gina_mahalek@unc.edu

Release available at: www.ibiblio.org/uncp/media/sla 

 

New Open-Access Short Works from UNC Press

and the Institute for the Study of the Americas

 

Chapel Hill, N.C.–The University of North Carolina Press (UNCP) and the Institute for the Study of the Americas (ISA) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill announce a new joint initiative in open-access scholarly publishing.

 

Studies in Latin America (SLA) is a new series of short works to be published by ISA and distributed by UNCP in digital open-access as well as in print and e-book formats.

 

Louis A. Pérez Jr., Director, Institute for the Study of the Americas, and J. Carlyle Sitterson Professor of History at UNC Chapel Hill, stated, “The Studies in Latin America series is designed to meet the emerging needs of a rapidly expanding body of social science scholarship on Latin America. The idea is to provide a new venue to disseminate original research in the form of short works of approximately 20,000 up to 35,000 words in length, and thereby offer scholars an opportunity to contemplate a new genre of scholarship coupled with an effective publishing outlet not previously available. The peer-reviewed short works open-access series promises to provide scholars with a vast readership and at the same time offer highly usable classroom texts.”

 

The Studies in Latin America series will promote new scholarship on Latin America and the Caribbean focusing on the social sciences–principally anthropology, geography, history, political science, and sociology–and featuring diverse methodological approaches and perspectives on vital issues concerning Latin America and the Caribbean, past and present.

 

The Spangler Family Director at UNC Press, John Sherer, hailed the new initiative as groundbreaking. “This series, which involves a three-way partnership between the Press, ISA, and the UNC Libraries, will be our first open-access initiative. It utilizes our new digital-first workflow to efficiently publish these shorter works, while maintaining the high level of quality and broad scope of dissemination traditionally associated with UNC Press books.”

 

Open-access content for Studies in Latin America will be hosted on the UNC Chapel Hill Libraries website.

 

“I am excited about this new venture in open-access publishing,” said Sarah C. Michalak, Associate Provost and University Librarian at UNC Chapel Hill. “The UNC Libraries and the UNC Press have worked together on several scholarly publishing projects aimed at making high-quality academic content broadly available. Studies in Latin America is a creative idea that will successfully advance that important work.”

 

The series will launch in 2015 with an anticipated two distributed works per year.

 

Studies in Latin America welcomes English-language manuscripts by senior scholars as well as by junior scholars. Submissions will undergo a formal peer-review process as part of the publication decision. The Institute for the Study of the Americas and UNC Press anticipate a wide distribution of the scholarship included in Studies in Latin America by taking advantage of the digital publishing environment.

 

For more information and inquiries about submissions, please contact Louis A. Pérez Jr., Director, Institute for the Study of the Americas, at perez@email.unc.edu or at Global Education Center, CB 3205, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N.C. 27599. Questions may also be addressed to Elaine Maisner, Senior Executive Editor, UNC Press, at emaisner@email.unc.edu or tel. 919-962-0810.

 

Visit http://uncpress.unc.edu/browse/page/863 for more information.

Founded in 1922, UNC Press is the oldest university press in the South and one of the oldest in the United States.

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)

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Thank you for your participation in this survey regarding the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, grants a two-year reprieve from deportation and a work permit. This is a survey of The Latino Migration Project at UNC Chapel Hill and is intended for the sole use of organizations and individuals who supported or participated in the DACA application process. We thank you for your thoughtful submissions. Please allow 10-15 minutes to complete the survey.

FOR ORGANIZATIONS-Click here for the organization survey. Available in English or Spanish.

FOR INDIVIDUALS/PARA LOS INDIVIDUOS-Click here for the individual survey in English/Haga clic aquí para español.

Questions? Please contact Dr. Hannah Gill, hgill@email.unc.edu

Check in with LMP Ambassador, Felicia Arriaga

The APPLES Guanajuato course is an interdisciplinary opportunity for students to examine Latin American immigrant perspectives through a combination of qualitative methods, migration theory, and service-learning. It has been such a pleasure to get a first-hand perspective from students researching and working with immigrants in receiving communities in North Carolina. Today we check in with one of these Guanajuato students and Latino Migration Project (LMP) Ambassador, Felicia Arriaga. Earlier, Felicia shared a poignant moment with us regarding the Guanajuato Alternative Spring Break. In this edition, Felicia shares her research for the APPLES Global Course Guanajuato.

feliciaEducation in North Carolina-Where are all the Latino/a educators?

By Felicia Arriaga

In my research project for the APPLES Global Course Guanajuato I sought to answer the following question:

  • What are the roles of Latino/a educators in the North Carolina K-12 Public Education System?
  • How do these Latino/a educators perceive their Latino students and how might they alter their methods of teaching and/or administrative duties to accommodate Latino students?
  • How have their own experiences as immigrants/migrants shaped their work?

In 2011-12, there were 104,300 full and part time public school teachers in North Carolina, and 2.7 percent of those those teachers were Hispanic, while the Hispanic student population in grades K-12 was 13 percent.* I asked myself, why is there an imbalance when it comes to teacher and student demographics? I thought, perhaps it has to deal with the relatively young Hispanic population in North Carolina where the median age of all Hispanic immigrants (both documented and undocumented) in the state is 23-years-old, while the median age of the native-born Hispanic population is 9-years-old. I also considered, maybe the discrepancy has to do with the desire of first generation individuals to go into a career that will allow them to provide for their immediate and extended families, and in North Carolina, teacher pay ranks 46th in the country during the 2012-2013 school year.* 

I think both of these reasons contribute to the imbalance, but there are also some other factors that I believe need further exploration. One is taking a closer look at whether or not there are diversity recruitment efforts for minority, and more specifically Latino/a, educators in North Carolina. The other factor that I’d like to examine is something I found while conducting interviews with a handful of Latino/a educators. Some of my interviewees highlighted the lack of respect they experienced as Latino/a educators, which is something they did not feel during their time teaching in Mexican school systems. They added that their observations of the same phenomenon is occurring in classrooms and more broadly in school environments within North Carolina. Although they love their current jobs, they all expressed the desire to better the state of education for both Latino students and for all students in general. 

These interviews made me questions why I, as a Latina born and raised in North Carolina, never thought about being a K-12 educator. Instead, I have chosen to put my efforts into teaching college-aged students who more than likely will be in a mix of  in and out-of-state students, regardless of where I decide to become a professor. I can’t help but think, is it because I never saw a Latino, or really any minority, teacher in front of the classroom? Is it because I really think I can make an impact on the college-aged population? Or do I think the investment in my doctorate will be enough to provide for my immediate family?

I learned a lot from these interviews and meeting such dedicated individuals inspires me to continue thinking about their responsibilities (formal and informal), many of which fall well outside their pay grade.

Felicia is a second year Ph.D. student in Sociology at Duke University. She is originally from Hendersonville, NC, and is writing her Master’s thesis focusing on the intersection of racial profiling of Latinos in traffic stops and Immigrantion and Customs Enforcement Programs in North Carolina. 

*SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, Schools and Staffing Survey(SASS), “Public School Teacher Data File,” 2011-12.

*SOURCE: National Education Associate, (2014). “Rankings & Estimates: Rankings of the States 2013 and Estimates of School Statistics 2014.” retrieved spring 2014 from http://www.nea.org/assets/docs/NEA-Rankings-and-Estimates-2013-2014.pdf

 

Research Share: Demographic and Economic Impacts of International Migration to North Carolina

ReportCoverWe would like to congratulate our colleagues at the Kenan-Flagler Business School for the release of their latest report, “Demographic and Economic Impacts of International Migration to North Carolina.

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Credit: NC Bankers Association

Commissioned by the North Carolina Bankers Association, UNC Chapel Hill’s Kenan-Flagler Business School and Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise produced a report on the exploding immigrant population in North Carolina. Its expansive scope examines data and population trends. One finding emphasizes North Carolina’s changing population from previous years. As evident by the diverse backgrounds of international migrants, this increase in changing communities has contributed to reshaping the geographic make up and racial/ethnic composition as well as the socioeconomic status of North Carolina’s population.

Read more here or see it featured on WUNC.org here.

 

 

Research Spotlight: Jeanine Navarrete

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“So much gets lost in the shuffle of immigration as a political issue, but we need to think about why people are here, why they felt they needed to leave their countires, and how we can humanize the process of becoming a citizen or gaining citizenship versus making it de-humanizing.”

The Latino Migration Project is pleased to offer Latino Migration Research Awards that range between $500-$1000. They are available to UNC Chapel Hill students and faculty conducting research relating to Latin American/Latino migration (awards have been made for 2014).

In the last spotlight, we met Andrew Ofstehage, who is using his award to conduct an ethnographical report on two transnational farming populations who have migrated from North America to Brazil to produce soybeans. Today, we interview Jeanine Navarrete, who is using her award to research the development of reactionary anti-immigration and anti-Latino politics in Miami, Florida from 1965 to 1980.

Before she became a third year PhD History student, Navarrete grew up in Miami, Florida. Her interests in migration came from a personal place as both of her parents came to the United States from Cuba in the early 1960s.

“Latino Migration has been my life,” Navarrete said. “I grew up with Cubans, Venezuelans, Colombians, Haitians, and people from all over the Caribbean.”

Navarrete received her Bachelor’s degree from Wellesley College. After she graduated, she moved back to Miami to work with TeenMiami, which is a project at HistoryMiami, where she trained a group of 10-15 teenagers to collect oral histories. The group interviewed adults who were teenagers in the 1960s and as a result, the group recorded approximately 75 Oral Histories.

As a PhD candidate at UNC, Navarrete’s research is centered on the Cuban immigration story from 1965-1980, starting with the Cuban Adjustment Act and ending with the Mariel Boatlift.  She plans to explore the political victory of the Bilingual ordinance, as well as the backlash that followed from both Anglos and African Americans. Navarrete plans to visit the Cuban Heritage Collection at the University of Miami, where they have a collection of exile periodicals that were printed in Miami and other places in the United States.

Although locally circumscribed to Miami, Navarrete hopes her research will have a broader impact in forcing more thought about issues of nativism and how an anti-immigrant sentiment has been a reoccurring theme throughout United States history. She said the arguments are fairly unchanged. Since the Civil Rights Act, she said language is now less explicitly racial, but is still coded with anxiety about immigrants. In Miami’s case, Navarrete said community members learned to either live and get along, while others left to live in different counties.

“States in the South are beginning to deal with higher numbers of migrants and there are many lessons to be learned from Miami in how to turn immigrants into citizens,” Navarrete said. “Cubans are a great test case as they were federally funneled and supported. I think this is a great case of what the possibilities are of having large immigrant and refugee populations and how citizens deal with it.”

As a child of immigrants, Navarrete said it’s important to think of immigrants as people, not as a political issue. She emphasized that the process of leaving one’s country is an extremely traumatic and painful process to undergo.

“So much gets lost in the shuffle of immigration as a political issue, but we need to think about why people are here, why they felt they needed to leave their countires, and how we can humanize the process of becoming a citizen or gaining citizenship versus making it de-humanizing,” Navarrete said.

We wish Navarrete all the best and look forward to the results!

Research Spotlight: Andrew Ofstehage

The Latino Migration Project is pleased to offer Latino Migration Research Awards that range between $500-$1000. They are available to UNC Chapel Hill students and faculty conducting research relating to Latin American/Latino migration.

In the last spotlight, we met Paul Fleming, who is using his award to further his public health focus as it relates to migrant populations. Today, we meet another award recipient, Andrew Ofstehage, who is using his research award to conduct an ethnographical report on two transnational farming populations who have migrated from North America to Brazil to produce soybeans. Andrew took some time out of his studies and work to tell us about farming, his extensive travels, and the unlikely inspiration for his research.

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“Migration is a process that is an attempt to preserve a way of life, but along the way, it requires change; even a change in values.”

Before he was a Ph.D. Anthropology student, Ofstehage was growing up in South Dakota and working for his family’s farm. He was studying to be a farmer at South Dakota State University until his junior study abroad experience in the Amazon/Andes region of Peru. There, he was more intrigued by the way people farm. This curiosity of global farming started an extensive track record of travel, which includes a West Africa Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) internship, earning a Master’s degree in Management of Agro-ecological Knowledge and Social Change (Applied Anthropology) in Holland, and studying Quinoa production in South America.

Having to decide between serving in the Peace Corps and attending UNC, Ofstehage chose to pursue a PhD at UNC Chapel Hill. His inspiration for his research came in an unlikely place— his dad’s farming magazine. In an article about corn and soy beans, Ofstehage became fascinated with the story of Midwesterners  who left the United States to pursue farming in Brazil. Farmers from the United States have moved to work in Brazil during the expansion of the soybean to the Amazon in Goiás, and then on the Cerrado of Northeast Brazil.  Two groups, Midwesterners and Mennonites, are farming in very different climates, one near the wet Amazon, the other in the dryer Cerrado, and Ofstehage hopes to present the complexity of a seemingly simple process.

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Ofstehage holds quinoa in southern Bolivia

“Farming is not just one process; we need to look at the place, technology, and the two groups’ values,” Ofestehage said. “I want to look at the production practices, changes in ecosystems, and workers.”

Ofstehage seeks to uncover the motivation of the farmers, which includes if they are driven by capital and land accumulation, or if their work is similar to historical examples of farmers creatively seeking solutions in the face of economic crisis. He wants to dive deeper into whether or not farmers are hoping to preserve their social interactions and socially-valued forms of farm work. At the same time, he hopes his research will inform more broadly on the processes of conservation and management of work in the environmentally fragile areas of Brazil.

“In transforming a good landscape, there needs to be a hybrid of adapting and imposing; for instance, the idea of the preservation of change,” Ofstehage said. “Migration is a process that is an attempt to preserve a way of life, but along the way, it requires change; even a change in values.”

We wish Andrew the best of luck and look forward to the results!

 

 

Research Spotlight: Paul Fleming, School of Public Health

The Latino Migration Project is pleased to offer Latino Migration Research Awards that range between $500-$1000. They are available to UNC Chapel Hill students and faculty conducting research relating to Latin American/Latino migration.

Today, we meet one of the award recipients, Paul Fleming, who is using his research award to further his public health focus as it relates to migrant populations. Paul took some time out of his studies and work at the Carolina Population Center to tell us about his research, experiences, and his hope for a better system of health care for migrant workers.

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Paul Fleming, Ph.D. Candidate School of Public Health

Before he was a third year Ph. D. student in Health Behavior at the School of Public Health, Paul had many engaging experiences, which include earning his undergraduate degree in Spanish and Political Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, serving as a Peace Corps member in Nicaragua, and graduating from Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health in Atlanta, Georgia.

Serving as a Peace Corps Community Health Volunteer greatly influenced his interests in migrant communities.

“I was interested in Latin America, but also exploring the idea of working with Latino migrants,” Fleming said. “Families in Nicaragua had a number of family members in the U.S., and in learning this side, I knew I wanted to pursue this further with a public health focus.”

At Emory, Fleming did just that. His research focused not only Latino migrant health, but also resources available to a population with limited access to health care.

Now as a UNC Ph.D. student, Fleming found a working group on Gender Migration and Health. With fellow Ph.D. student Laura Villa-Torres, Fleming received a LMP research award to look at the health of Latino migrants to explore how transnational networks are used in health care and access. Fleming and the team are now preparing a survey and plan to interview 75-100 people this summer. With an understanding that migrant workers spend a great deal of time finding work, Fleming said health is often not prioritized. However, by not prioritizing health, issues arise that prevent workers from their jobs.

“There is this central thing of working that migrant workers need to be doing, and health plays a big part in them being able to do that,” Fleming said.

Fleming hopes at the end of his research to have a better understanding as to how Latino migrant workers are meeting their health needs, and in turn, how service organizations can better support this established system.

We wish Paul the best of luck in his research and look forward to the results!

 

Read the 2014 LMP Newsletter

The 2014 Newsletter is out!

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